02/28/2021

Flood Alert in South Florida by subtropical Alberto storm

2 min read
The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has a current flood warning for South Florida until Sunday when the subtropical storm Alberto, the first named storm of the 2018 hurricane season, moves slowly through the Caribbean Sea.
subtropical storm alberto

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has a current flood warning for South Florida until Sunday when the subtropical storm Alberto, the first named storm of the 2018 hurricane season, moves slowly through the Caribbean Sea.

There is a tropical storm warning posted on parts of the Gulf Coast from the Florida Panhandle southwest of Tallahassee to the New Orleans metropolitan area.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said Alberto was centered about 70 miles south of the western tip of Cuba. Alberto moved north-northeast toward the Yucatan Channel and moving north at 9 mph. Its maximum sustained winds were 40 mph. Gradual strengthening was expected as the storm moved northward.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said its maximum sustained winds were 40 mph. A gradual strengthening was expected over the weekend as it moves north.

The storm will reach the United States coast near Mobile, Alabama on Monday night, so the circulation center will be far from Florida. However, the upper level wind pattern will extract substantial moisture from this system and leave a wet week.

The US coast began to feel the effects of Alberto this Saturday. The hurricane center said it is possible to record up to 12 inches of rain in the Florida Keys and south and southwest Florida. Residents who live on the predicted path of the storm are advised to monitor their progress.

According to NHC meteorologists, the flood potential will increase throughout this region early next week, as Alberto’s slowdown is forecast after it moves inland.

The National Weather Service said a flash flood warning would be in effect from Saturday night until Tuesday night for southeastern Mississippi, southwestern Alabama and west of the Florida Panhandle. A storm surge alert was also issued for parts of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.

A subtropical storm has a less defined center and colder than a tropical storm, and its strongest winds are farthest from its center. Subtropical storms can turn into tropical storms, which in turn can turn into hurricanes.

Alberto arrived ahead of schedule: the six-month hurricane season begins on June 1.

Parts of Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana have already seen heavy rains this week, and other floods could leave those areas vulnerable to flash floods and river flooding.

In some communities facing the sea and in front of the river they are already delivering sandbags.

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